Recent activities

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Report of 30th Session of Human Rights Council (14th September – 2nd October)

  1. Oral Statements
  • Transitional justice in Sri Lanka (Item 3: Clustered Interactive Dialogue with the Special Rapporteur on the promotion of truth, justice, reparation and guarantees of non-recurrence, Tuesday 15th September)

http://imadr.org/transitionaljustice-sri-lanka-hrc30-2015-os/

http://imadr.org/oisl-tj-srilanka-hrc30-2015-os/

  1. Written Statements
  • Human Rights Violations in Okinawa, Japan (Item 4: Human rights situations that require the Council’s attention), joint submission with Shimin Gaikou Centre and All Okinawa Council.

http://imadr.org/humanrights-violations-okinawa-japan-hrc30-2015-joint-ws/

  • Truth, justice, reparation and guarantees of non-recurrence in Sri Lanka (Item 2: Annual report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights and reports of the Office of the High Commissioner and the Secretary-General)

http://imadr.org/truth-justice-reparation-guarantees-of-non-recurrence-srilanka-hrc30-2015-ws/

  1. Statements joined
  • Evaluation of the Second Phase of the World Programme for Human Rights Education (Joint oral statement submitted by International Organization for the Right to Education and Freedom of Education (OIDEL) Please see the attachment
  1. Side Events
  • Enforced disappearances in Sri Lanka (Friday 18th September), co-sponsored by Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development (FORUM-ASIA), Asian Federation Against Involuntary Disappearances, Franciscans International and Minority Rights Group International.

Summary of the event:

http://imadr.org/enforceddisappearances-srilanka-hrc30-18september2015/

  • Militarization and Human Rights Violations in Okinawa, Japan (Monday 21st September), co-organised/ sponsored by All Okinawa Council, Shimin Gaikou Centre and Franciscans International

Summary of the event: http://imadr.org/militarizationhumanrights_okinawa_japan_hrc30-21september2015/

  • Civil Society Responses to the OHCHR report on Sri Lanka (Monday 28th September), sponsored by Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development (FORUM-ASIA) and Minority Rights Group International.

Summary of the event: http://imadr.org/csresponses-ohchrreport-srilanka-hrc30-28september2015/

  1. Other lobbying and advocacy activities
  • Sri Lanka: During the Council, the Geneva office arranged a number of meetings for President Nimalka Fernando with various stakeholders with regard to Sri Lanka including Permanent Missions, OHCHR special procedures and other mandate holders, and NGOs
  • Okinawa, Japan: the Geneva office supported All Okinawa Council by organising a press conference and assisting them at meetings with OHCHR special procedures and Asia-Pacific section.
  1. Outcomes of HRC 30 related to IMADR activities
  • The resolution on “Promoting reconciliation, accountability and human rights in Sri Lanka” (A/HRC/30/L.29) submitted by USA, UK, Montenegro and Sri Lanka was adopted by consensus. It requests the OHCHR to monitor the implementation of recommendations of OHCHR report on Sri Lanka. OHCHR is requested to present an oral update at the 32nd session and a full report at the 34th session of the Human Rights Council.
  • The resolution on “Human rights and indigenous peoples” (A/HRC/30/L.8) submitted by Mexico and Guatemala was adopted by consensus. It decides to hold a half-day panel discussion on the causes and consequence of violence against indigenous women and girls, including those with disabilities, at the 33rd session of the Human Rights Council.
  • The resolution on “Review of the mandate of the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples” (A/HRC/30/L.9) submitted by Mexico was adopted by consensus. It requests the OHCHR to organise a workshop on the topic no later than the first quarter of 2016, and submit report on the workshop to the 32nd session of the Human Rights Council. It also invites States to discuss the report at the 9th session of EMRIP.
  • The resolution on “Promotion of the right to peace” (A/HRC/30/L.13) proposed by Cuba was adopted by vote (Yes: 33, No: 12, Abstention: 2), which decides to hold 4th session of the Working Group for 5 days to finalise the draft declaration.
  • The resolution on “From rhetoric to reality: a global call for concrete action against racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance” (A/HRC/30/L.20) proposed by Algeria on behalf of African Group was adopted by vote (Yes: 33, No: 11, Abstention: 3). It requests the OHCHR to submit an update on its activities regarding the International Decade for People of African Descent at the 31st session of the Human Rights Council. It also requests States to consider withdrawing the reservation on Article 4 of ICERD.
  • “Forum on people of African descent in the diaspora” resolution (A/HRC/30/L.21) proposed by Algeria on behalf of African Group was adopted by vote (Yes: 32, No: 12, Abstention: 3). It requests the Secretary-General to review and rescind the mandate of the Working Group on Durban Declaration, and to allocate its resources to establish a forum on people of African descent. It recommends the General Assembly to hold regional consultation in preparation of the establishment of this forum.
  1. Other highlighted resolutions

* Resolution on “Human rights and preventing and countering violent extremism” proposed by Colombia and Morocco was adopted by vote, 37 in favour, 3 against and 7 abstentions. Universal Rights Group – “The text was only adopted after a number of amendments were voted down, and following a vote on the text as a whole. Opponents of the resolution pointed to the lack of a clearly defined legal concept of ‘violent extremism’ and a lack of clarity over the difference between violent extremism and terrorism. These and other concerns, such as over the perceived lack of safeguards to ensure that the right of self-determination cannot be misinterpreted as violent extremism, and a conviction that domestic law cannot take precedence over international law (referring to the US’ reservation to article 20 of ICCPR), led South Africa to vote against the resolution. It is clearly disappointing that two of the world’s most important democracies, the US and South Africa, both with strong human rights traditions, were unable to agree on a matter of such global importance, and that negotiations and the adoption of the text were marked by polarising language.”

Joint Oral Statment